Uploaded 31-Oct-14
Taken 27-Oct-14
Visitors 35


7 of 15 photos
Thumbnails
Info
Categories & Keywords

Category:Scenic
Subcategory:Deserts
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:California, Death Valley, Dunes, badwater Basin, geology, landscape
Photo Info

Dimensions5752 x 3835
Original file size12.7 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken27-Oct-14 21:56
Date modified31-Oct-14 23:28
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeCanon
Camera modelCanon EOS 5D Mark III
Focal length17 mm
Max lens aperturef/4
Exposure1/400 at f/7.1
FlashNot fired, compulsory mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeAuto
Exposure prog.Aperture priority
ISO speedISO 200
Metering modePattern
Badwater

Badwater

Badwater Basin is an endorheic basin in Death Valley National Park, Death Valley, Inyo County, California, noted as the lowest point in North America, with an elevation of 282 ft (86 m) below sea level. Mount Whitney, the highest point in the contiguous 48 states, is only 84.6 miles (136 km) to the WNW.

The site itself consists of a small spring-fed pool of "bad water" next to the road in a sink; the accumulated salts of the surrounding basin make it undrinkable, thus giving it the name. The pool does have animal and plant life, including pickleweed, aquatic insects, and the Badwater snail.Adjacent to the pool, where water is not always present at the surface, repeated freeze–thaw and evaporation cycles gradually push the thin salt crust into hexagonal honeycomb shapes.

The pool is not the lowest point of the basin: the lowest point (which is only slightly lower) is several miles to the west and varies in position, depending on rainfall and evaporation patterns. The salt flats are hazardous to traverse (in many cases being only a thin white crust over mud), and so the sign marking the low point is at the pool instead. The basin was considered the lowest elevation in the Western Hemisphere until the discovery of Laguna del Carbón in Argentina at −344 ft (−105 m).